The Wasp from Wuhan

I was sitting on my balcony when a wasp came buzzing around to investigate. “What are you up to in my territory? Is what I heard”. Within seconds our family time ended as my son made a hasty decision to exit. Clearly my son heard something else. “Buzz off” maybe… 

I sat there thinking how one small thing changed that moment. Which brought to mind the butterfly in Brazil. I had a general idea that it referred to the impact of a tiny action and how it is felt across the world. Also the fact that we are all connected.

Never really had the time to look it up. I just did. Here is what I found on Wikipedia “In chaos theory, the butterfly effect is the sensitive dependence on initial conditions in which a small change in one state of a deterministic nonlinear system can result in large differences in a later state.

The term, closely associated with the work of Edward Lorenz, is derived from the metaphorical example of the details of a tornado (the exact time of formation, the exact path taken) being influenced by minor perturbations such as the flapping of the wings of a distant butterfly several weeks earlier.”

The wasp from Wuhan was making its presence felt for sure. But it also gives me hope. Hope that the same ability to spread goodness is within our reach.

I am a big believer in the power of positivity. So I remain optimistic on the power we have. Every one of us can spread joy, happiness and kindness. We can touch each other (figuratively 😊 keeping in mind the need for social distance) in ways that spread positivity across the world.

Now is the time to find a way to pass on that positive energy which can also be infectious. At a time like this, “He / she has an infectious smile” is a nice way to think about our ability to infect the world.

In the midst of all the WhatsApp messages going viral I came across one that really touched a chord. It was in a group where we exchange information related to the subject of Coaching and HR. 

 

It was a reminder on the wonderful gift that coaching can be. The power to transform lives, one person at a time, is something we all possess.

So as I sit on my balcony self-quarantined today, possibly forcibly quarantined tomorrow, I will flap my wings. I will find a way to bring a smile to someone’s face. To calm an agitated mind. One person at a time.

The wasp has unleashed itself on the world. It has a sting in its tail. We don’t need any more mathematical models to prove to us that humanity is connected. We are one. It’s time to use that insight to infect the world with hope and positivity. If each one of us does our small bit, we will get through this chaos, together. This is the time for #EachOneReachOne.

Our ability to stay mentally strong is going to be tested in the weeks and months to come. We owe it to each other to help in any way we can, knowing that one small action can and will be felt across the world. Be your best self. Find the smallest of ways to help. To contribute. To be part of the solution. This is not a list of things you can do. It’s a reminder that even the smallest thing can make a difference. 

Think of one person. Think of one small thing that you can do to make their day better. Every little drop of goodness counts. So make a start. However small or seemingly insignificant, we know for sure it will have an impact. Let’s infect the world with smiles and positivity. Stay healthy. Stay happy.


The views and opinions published here belong to the author and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the publisher.

Nikhil Dey
Nikhil Dey is Vice Chair of Weber Shandwick India. Nurturing talent and helping clients achieve their goals is what makes him happy. He loves learning from students of communication, teaching courses and guest lecturing at various educational institutions. When he is not working you will find him on the tennis court or out for long walks with his family and four legged friends.
Nikhil is a certified life and leadership coach (International Coach Federation - ICF).
He can be reached on twitter @deydreaming

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